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Features

  • The 24th Anniversary Clementsville Variety Show was held Saturday night in front of a packed crowd at the St. Bernard Catholic Church. Conceived as “something fun to do” by sisters Betty Wethington and Eileen Summers in 1974, the show featured many of the original cast performing in skits, plays and musical selections.

  • Tommy Murphy decided that after almost three years of courting Brittany Atwood, it was time to pop the question.

    Murphy, 31, an engineer for the railroad, wanted to find a unique way to propose to Atwood. He had a 3-feet by 3-feet white sign made with the proposal in big blue letters that read: “Brittany, will you marry me?”

    Atwood, 26, a nurse at Liberty Family Medical, is also a Media Clerk aid in the Casey County High School Library.

  • The eighth annual Turkey Trot for Tots 5K run/walk road race was held in sub-freezing temperatures Saturday morning in Liberty.

    A 100-yard dash for children aged 6-and-under and 6-12 opened the event’s festivities.

    Sponsored by Back and Body Chiropractic as a fund-raiser for the Casey County Community Ministries Toys for Kids, the event registered 92 participants and raised $3,395, according to Susan Garrett, of Back and Body Chiropractic.

    Water and tissues, donated by Family Home Health Care, were handed out during the race.

  • L.J. and Billye Watson of Liberty are proud to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Alissa Watson to Derrick Clark, son of Wayne and Marilyn Clark of Fisherville. The wedding is planned for Friday, Nov. 28, 2008 at 2:30 p.m. at the Church of the Epiphany in Louisville. Alissa is a graduate of Casey County High Schoool and Western Kentucky University and an employee at Bardstown City Schools. Clark is a graduate of duPont Manual High School and University of Louisville and an employee of Smart Systems.

  • A simple shoe box could put smiles on the faces of several needy children.

    It’s part of an international charitable effort known as Operation Christmas Child.

    The Boone, N.C.-based project is billed as the largest of its kind. Organizers hope to help more than 8 million needy children in 100 countries, many affected by natural disasters. The group sends shoe boxes, filled with treats and supplies, to children around the world.

  • Santa Claus will be making his annual trip from the North Pole in about five weeks, so now is the time for Casey County youngsters to make their Christmas wishes known.

    Local boys and girls who would like to write to Santa may send their letters to The Casey County News and we will forward them on to the North Pole in time for Christmas.

    We will also be printing a special section of “Letters to Santa,” which will be included in our Dec. 17 issue.

  • Santa Claus will be making his annual trip from the North Pole in about five weeks, so now is the time for Casey County youngsters to make their Christmas wishes known.

    Local boys and girls who would like to write to Santa may send their letters to The Casey County News and we will forward them on to the North Pole in time for Christmas.

    We will also be printing a special section of “Letters to Santa,” which will be included in our Dec. 17 issue.

  • As a young boy growing up on the fringes of a Mafia family, Russell Vassallo knew about protection and loyalty to the family and “omerta,” the code of silence, that dictated one never squeals to the authorities under penalty of death.

    And to prove it, he shot a federal agent in the face under the gaze of then FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover.

    Vassallo was just 5 years old in 1939 when he watched federal agents invade his grandfather’s farm in Stirling, N.J. searching for a mob hit man named Lepke.

  • Eric W. Luttrell, son of Larry and Susie Luttrell, and Molly A. Ledford, daughter of Leah and Rick Knox and Andy Ledford, are proud to announce their engagement and forthcoming marriage joining their two families together on Friday, Jan. 16, 2009. Eric is shown holding his daughter, Addison, and Leah holding her son, Airon Wayne.

  • How can quitters be winners? When it comes to smoking.

    Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the United States. Each year, smoking accounts for an estimated 438,000 premature deaths, including 38,000 deaths among nonsmokers as a result of secondhand smoke, according to reports from the American Cancer Society.

  • It was 1950, gas was about a quarter a gallon, Truman had just approved the development of the hydrogen bomb and the baby boom was just starting to ... well, boom.

    If all that wasn’t excitement enough, one Casey County native was just about to land a job that would, over the next half-century, make him one of the most recognizable fixtures of local media ever in the county.

    Now, 58 years later, Earl Randolph, retired production manager for The Casey County News, can sit on his porch swing and look back at a long, satisfying and eventful career in rural media.

  • Matthew Winston Davis, son of Ronnie and Sally Davis of Liberty, and Betty Jo Allen, daughter of Danny Jo and Barbara Allen of Leitchfield, Ky. were united in marriage Saturday, Oct. 11, 2008 at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Leitchfield.

    The bride is a third grade teacher at Toliver Elementary in Danville. The groom is employed at Davis’ Furniture and Appliances in Liberty. After a honeymoon trip to Mexico, the couple now resides in Danville.

  • In what had to be the shortest Veterans Day ceremony on record due to the rainy and cool weather, about 75 citizens turned out Tuesday at 11 a.m. in front of the Doughboy statue on the Courthouse Square to pay tribute to about 20 local veterans of the United States Armed Forces.

    Veterans Day is a federal holiday marking the end of WWI. The peace agreement between the Allied forces and Germany was signed Nov. 11, 1918 at the 11th hour in France.

  • The Casey County Public Library presented a “whodunnit” murder mystery and desserts bar Saturday night at the Central Kentucky AG/EXPO Center. Proceeds will benefit the library’s children’s programs.

  • The Casey County Public Library presented a “whodunnit” murder mystery and desserts bar Saturday night at the Central Kentucky AG/EXPO Center. Proceeds will benefit the library’s children’s programs.

  • Nicholas James Dixon and Michelle Marie Esterle were united in marriage on July 11, 2008 during a Nuptial Mass at St. Albert the Great Catholic Church in Louisville. Father Lawman Chibundi was the Celebrant, along with Father Pat Dolan.

    Stephanie Esterle, sister of the bride, was the maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Rita Dixon, sister of the groom, Megan Brake, Laura Eppstein, and Kate Benner.

    Allison Revers and Anna Tabler, cousins of the bride, were junior bridesmaids.

  • A post-World War I artifact — believed to include tokens from generations of Casey County natives, former business owners and members of the Communist party — could make an appearance at this year’s Veteran’s Day celebration.

    The larger-than-life portrait was apparently housed in an old tobacco barn for decades before its discovery and donation to the City of Liberty earlier this summer.

    “We’re very fortunate to have it,” Liberty Mayor Steve Sweeney said. “We just dusted it off lightly and put plexi-glass over it.”

  • Rupert Thermopolis may have just proved the old saying, “Cats Rule, Dogs Drool.”

    Rupert, a 4-year-old white feline rescued from the Boyle County Humane Society when he was a kitten, beat out 22 other pets — mostly dogs — to become The Casey County News’ 2008 Pet of the Year.

    Rupert is owned by Sarah Coffman of Middleburg, and got his unusual name from the movie “Princess Diaries.”

    “That was the name of the king,” explained Sarah, an eighth-grader at Casey County Middle School.

  • A propane-infused flame fuels the torch, that melts the rod, that eventually oxidizes into Toni Menk’s masterpieces. Flecks of metal, glass and chemicals are swirled together, reacting in a process known as coefficient thermal expansion.

    An advanced-degree in chemistry is almost needed to understand the intricacies of lampworking. Luckily, little is needed to appreciate the beauty behind Menk’s creations.

  • John Robert and Dede Allen’s small, vinyl sided house on Griffith Ridge Road was falling into disrepair.

    Disabled and confined to a wheelchair, Mr. Allen, at 80 years of age, is not able to take care of rotted windows, crumbling floor joists in a bedroom and a caved-in subfloor in the bathroom.

    Squirrels built a nest behind a soffit — the straw and twig nest peeks out, causing the soffit to bow from the underside of the roof.

    However, by Wednesday afternoon, these repairs and a few more had been made on the house.