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Today's Opinions

  • To pot or not to pot

    By Joberta Wells 

    I am just a simple old country woman but something has piqued my curiosity. Why has the former Speaker of the House, John Boehner, all of a sudden decided that we need to legalize and decriminalize the use of marijuana? Along those same lines, why has his good buddy, the current Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, introduced a bill to allow hemp farming? Are these bad boys getting paid off by someone in the cannabis business? Inquiring minds want to know!

  • Helping recovering addicts get back to work

    By Mitch McConnell 

    Substance abuse is the public health crisis of this generation. It’s claiming lives in Kentucky and across the nation at an unprecedented rate. Like nearly half of all Americans, you or your family probably know someone whose life has been torn apart because of drug addiction.

    But as a leader in Kentucky’s business community recently noted, this problem isn’t only devastating families and communities. It’s also a workforce emergency.

  • Local elections are the most important elections

    In races where Republican candidates have no Democratic challenger, the results of the May 22 Primary election for Casey County offices will almost certainly produce November’s General Election winner. There’s a lot at stake, and I hope that those who can vote, choose to exercise that right.

    People stopping by The Casey County News office here in Liberty have said this election will “make or break” the county. I probably wouldn’t go that far.

  • The Yoders go to school

    By Gloria Yoder

    “What’s the forecast for Wednesday?” we all had the same question. We were all hoping for a beautiful sunny day, perfect for our annual “school picnic.”It’s a day we all look forward to. In the forenoon, the school children, in our little country school, ranging from grades 1-8 present the program they had practiced the weeks before. After a tasty meal, anyone is welcome to join in some good games of softball.

  • Reforms free some from welfare’s sticky web

    While pension problems, budget constraints and tax increases by spineless Republicans and protests by uninformed and emotionally erratic Democrats and their constituencies have dominated recent press coverage, implementation of Gov. Matt Bevin’s most consequential reform – requiring able-bodied adult Medicaid recipients to have “skin in the game,” as the governor famously stated and which resulted in fits of hysteria by many on the political Left – has begun and will be complete by years’ end.

  • Controversial pardon marred legacy of past Kentucky governor

    By Stuart W. Sanders

    Kentucky Historical Society

    Pardons have been in the news lately.

    President Donald Trump recently pardoned Lewis “Scooter” Libby, Vice President Dick Cheney’s former chief of staff, who was convicted of obstruction of justice and perjury. Libby’s charges stemmed from the investigation surrounding the leaking of CIA officer Valerie Plame’s identity.

  • Candidates should make realistic plans

    To the Editor:

    I would like to discuss the upcoming local elections, and what it means to the citizens of our county.

    My opinion, for whatever it is worth, is that every candidate running should have solid ideas on how they will improve the area once they are elected.

    Even in good times, improvements can always be made, and good enough, is never good enough.

    I have had several candidates come to my door. The first question I ask is, “If you are elected, what will you try to do to improve the lives of your constituents.”

  • Growing Kentucky’s economy with hemp

    For far too long, the federal government has prevented most farmers from growing hemp. Although it was a foundational part of Kentucky’s heritage and today you can buy products made with hemp at stores across the country, most farmers have been barred from planting it in their fields. I have heard from many Kentucky farmers who agree it’s time to remove the federal hurdles in place and give our state the opportunity to seize its full potential and once again become the national leader for hemp production.