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Opinion

  • I hope that our readers will take a few minutes and read Rita Harris’ excellent story on the new Casey County High School basketball coach, Maze Stallworth.

    When I heard that Stallworth was going to be the next coach, I did a little research and found that he had a stellar career in high school and also in college at Morehead State.

    It’s quite clear that he knows the game of basketball and has had excellent coaches himself, as he told Rita in the story.

  •  A friend of mine, a famous dog lady, called me recently and told me about the strange and hilarious name she had just heard — Nathalonia. We had a long conversation about names we hear these days and we questioned why parents would saddle kids with names that the kids couldn’t spell until they were in high school and that their teachers couldn’t pronounce or spell.

  •  The buzz about town has been the opening of Lights of Liberty, the newly renovated Kentuckian Theater on Hustonville Street.

    Tracey and Laura Hebrock have done a marvelous job rejuvenating a slice of small town Americana that had all but died across our nation.

    In a conversation with local historian David King, he reminded me that the movie industry went into a slump in the mid-1970s from which theaters in small towns never recovered. The Kentuckian showed its last movie — The Taking of Pelham 123 — on April 7, 1975.

  • It has been said that it doesn’t take much to make small town people happy. And while that may be true, one recent event in Liberty takes happiness to a whole new level.

    Thanks to Tracey and Laura Hebrock’s investment of more than 18 months in time and a ton of money, we now have a beautiful theater in downtown Liberty where movie goers can watch first-run movies, for adults and kids.

    But it’s not only about watching movies. 

  • Who do you call when you’re stranded on the side of the road? It’s not Ghost Busters. Who do you call when the cat pees in your electrical outlet? It’s not Ghost Busters. Who do you call when you need a new appliance, piece of furniture, or carpet? It’s not Ghost Busters.

  •  It’s a great day when a person can spend at least a few minutes with a living legend. 

    I covered the Great Outhouse Blowout on Saturday in Gravel Switch where Bob Hill was honored with the Moon and Stars Award. Hill was recognized for an article he wrote in 1992 about Chet Atkin’s visit to Penn’s Store for the dedication of Penn’s Privy.

  •  We are indeed fortunate to live in a community with good law enforcement officers on the city, county, and state levels.

    Rarely do we hear of a home invasion where robbers force their way into a home when the family is there. That’s big city crime and it’s not welcome here.

    One way crime is in check is because of small town policing in Liberty.

    On Monday night, Officer Harold Cochran was seen “shaking” doorknobs in the downtown Liberty area.

  •  Usually when someone makes a positive comment about a picture I’m in, I take it because it doesn’t happen often. Mr. Photogenic I am not. So when a dear, saintly lady in my church complimented the “wonderful” picture of my son Dave and me taken during this year’s Vacation Bible School, I had to take a second look at it because there was something about it I didn’t like.

  •  Everybody has been bored at one time or another when some older person gives them the benefit of their weather prognostication skills. Well, I am an older person and I’m about to do the same thing.

  •  For those who complain there’s never anything to do in Casey County, you obviously haven’t attended Country Days festival. If you haven’t, you’ve missed a real dandy of a family friendly event.

    Held this past weekend at the Butchertown Community Center in the northern part of the county, Country Days has activities for every member of the family.

    Just having completed its 27th annual event this past Saturday, the small crew of Butchertown folk who organize this event did an exceptional job, as always, of planning and execution.

  •  I was remembering an old story the other day about a businessman barreling through the countryside in his Lincoln Town Car. The guy is hopelessly lost and stops in a little one horse town he happens upon, pulling into a service station in the days when service stations were actually service stations. The attendant saunters out, chewing on a straw, and asks the man what he needs.

    “I’m lost,” the businessman confesses.

    The gas station attendant squints at the driver and asks, “Do you know where you are?”

  •  I was remembering an old story the other day about a businessman barreling through the countryside in his Lincoln Town Car. The guy is hopelessly lost and stops in a little one horse town he happens upon, pulling into a service station in the days when service stations were actually service stations. The attendant saunters out, chewing on a straw, and asks the man what he needs.

    “I’m lost,” the businessman confesses.

    The gas station attendant squints at the driver and asks, “Do you know where you are?”

  •   Have you seen my hair this summer? I feel like a big dandelion that’s gone to seed. I look like a big dandelion that’s gone to seed. When the humidity is high and when I sweat, my hair turns into a mess of waves and frizz. In winter it’s more manageable.

    I have been on a crusade to find a shampoo and conditioner that will tame the mess. If you’ve been to a drugstore or Walmart lately, you undoubtedly came away from the shampoo and conditioner aisle as perplexed as I was. There are dozens of different types. 

  •  An attorney and I had a conversation recently in which he pointed out, at least to him, a glaring injustice when it comes to Kentucky law.

    It seems that a male adult who sends an obscene image or video to a minor, say, a 17 year old, is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor and can have his name assigned to the Sex Offender Registry for up to 20 years. There can also be a jail sentence of up to 12 months associated with this charge.

  •  “How long did you say you are you going to be home?”

    That was my dad’s question to me, Christmas holidays, 1975-76.

    I had set my shaving kit in the small bathroom I had shared with Dad for years. Then, I had moved his shaving cream, after-shave lotion, and cologne to the side so I could spread out mine where his had been, just like I had done when I was in high school.

  • With redistricting in the books and even though the possibility of a lawsuit challenging the new district lines exists, for the time being, Casey County no longer has Rep. Terry Mills, D-Lebanon. And that is a loss for us.

    I first met Mills in 2010 when he was running for the seat vacated by Jimmy Higdon. From the start, I liked Mills because he seemed like a genuine person, not just someone seeking votes by telling someone what they wanted to hear.

  •  Have you heard the news? The Casey County News has a new editor, Larry Rowell. We haven’t had an editor since Donna Carman left us more than 18 months ago.

    What do I think about Larry being editor? Well, I did a little two-column accounting with the cons on the left and the pros on the right. Here’s how it turned out.

    Cons: (1) He loves Georgia football. (2) He loves U of L basketball. (3) He fries chicken in peanut oil instead of lard.

  •  After the dust had settled on Friday afternoon when state lawmakers headed home from Frankfort and this summer’s extraordinary session to deal with redistricting, the news came with a mixed blessing for Casey County.

    We’ll lose Rep. Terry Mills, D-Lebanon, who has served us well since 2010. Mills was a fixture at local events, and genuinely cared about our residents, no matter their political persuasion.

  •  They let her know he wasn’t her “real” dad when she was a little girl. 

    It stung, at least for a while. “I always thought I was my daddy’s ‘real’ little girl. I guess I was afraid that might change.”

    But it didn’t. Not even for a moment.

  • The adage, “time flies when you’re having fun,” certainly applies in the case of your humble reporter with The Casey County News.

    On Tuesday, I celebrated five years with the paper as a staff writer, and I haven’t one time regretted accepting the position and learning about this unique part of Kentucky.

    I have stated many times in this column why I like Casey County and though there is beautiful terrain here, I mostly like the residents — you, dear readers.