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Opinion

  • By Bob Martin
    Guest columnist

    There are two types of pension systems: the defined benefits program and the defined contributions program. It is telling that private employers totally abandoned defined benefits pensions in the 70s and 80s, while almost all public-sector employers still rely on defined benefits pensions. Private sector employers pay for pensions with their own money, while public-sector employers pay for pensions with someone else’s money.

  • By Jim Waters

    Hardin County Schools Superintendent Teresa Morgan at a recent town hall on public pensions bemoaned the fact that interest in vacant teaching positions has dropped in recent years from as many as 100 applicants per opening to as few as 10, with some openings in math and science-related fields nearly impossible to fill.

  • By Dr. William Holland

    When we talk about life being filled with possibilities, we usually imagine someone stepping into our situation and helping us achieve our goals.

  • By Jim Waters

    What does a silver bullet cost?

    At least $490 million – the figure being thrown around by bureaucrats charged with implementing Kentucky Wired, the ill-advised 3,400-mile statewide broadband network initially estimated to cost less than $350 million to build.

  • By Joberta Wells
    Casey County News columnist

    “R-E-S-P-E-C-T, find out what it means to me.” Thanks, Aretha. I’ll tell you what it means to me.

  • By Don White
    Casey County News correspondent

    It was early fall of 1978.

    Sweet smells from the latest Apple Festival lingered in the air.

    Fred J. Burkhard drove into town from Creston, parked his Ford El

    Camino on Middleburg Street, and entered the tiny office of The Casey County News.

    It was my last day as editor, and I was happy the legend I had succeeded three years earlier wanted to say goodbye. Maybe wish me well in my new job as editor of The Anderson News in Lawrenceburg.

  • My husband is a man who has some strong convictions.  One of those is that everything is better when it’s cooked in cast iron. He likes to cook and he especially likes to cook using his cast iron cookware. He’s raised our two daughters to have a certain reverence for cast iron and has even gone so far as to give our oldest, who is married, her own cast iron cookware.

  • In a Liberty City Council meeting with only three things on the agenda — the city’s audit, second reading and adoption of next year’s budget, and, at the request of Police Chief Steven Garrett, declaring seven Glock 22 pistols surplus property, the meeting should have been uneventful.
    Au contraire.
    Instead of Mayor Steven Brown asking for a motion to adjourn, he opened the floor to attendees or anyone else who wanted to address the council.

  • These are crazy times that we’re living in, especially when it comes to restrooms in public schools.
    The Kentucky Senate passed a bill, now headed to the House of Representatives, that clarifies where transgender students may use the restroom in public schools.
    The Legislative Research Commission in Frankfort reported that Sen. C.B. Embry Jr., R-Morgantown, said the legislation would require public school students to use the restrooms of their biological sex or seek special accommodations. The legislation passed by a 27-9 vote after a lengthy floor debate.

  • Benjamin Franklin warned us long ago, “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.”
    Ignorance is bliss – this is a phrase I’ve come to find absolute truth within, because it is just that, the truth.
    My curious mind has never allowed me to understand the phrase completely, though it has fully supported the opposite argument.
    Staying informed is madness.  

  • As of late, I haven’t run into anyone over the age of 21 who enthusiastically informed me that they were thrilled with this year’s campaign ads, which began back in January.
    “I just love these ads, believe every one of them, and I made up my mind who to vote for while watching these commercials,” said no one ever.

  • In my continued praise of all new technologies, I ask you to return with me to a kinder, gentler, and simpler time, not so very long ago. We need never forget when whence we cameth.
    It amazes me to be in a crowd anywhere today and watch people play with their smartphones, checking Facebook updates, texting, or surfing the Internet. Seems they’re doing anything other than actually making phone calls.

  • I can’t help but dig the song “You love the thunder,” by Jackson Browne, because it couldn’t be more true – I do love the thunder. And the lightning. And the wind.
    Put it all together and you’ve got one of my favorite weather combinations – the thunderstorm.
    Thunderstorms are something that has and always will bring my family together. (Of course, leave it to my eccentric family to find unity within destruction).

  • I could not agree with Abigail Whitehouse more in her column, “I hate country music,” in the July 16 edition. I was a die hard country fan since I was a small child and would listen to my uncle Fay Overstreet’s vast record collection of country hits back in the 50s and
    60s.

  • In my continued praise of all new technologies, I ask you to return with me to a kinder, gentler, and simpler time, not so very long ago. We need never forget when whence we cameth.
    It amazes me to be in a crowd anywhere today and watch people play with their smartphones, checking Facebook updates, texting, or surfing the Internet. Seems they’re doing anything other than actually making phone calls.

  • I was scrolling through various advice columns on the internet the other night, when I came across  a Steve Martin quote that really stuck with me.
    Normally I expect piffy, humorous one-liners from Martin because he is first and foremost a comedian. But even if this quote was meant to be funny, there is a real and serious truth behind it, in my opinion.
    Martin said when people ask him ‘how do you make it in show business?’ his answer is “be so good they can’t ignore you.”

  • Don’t you love the title? There’s more art than science to kraut making unless you are a biologist/scientist. I’m just a simple old country woman and I lean to the art side of making kraut.
    I have made kraut the last two years with my friends Ophelia and her father, Barney.  In 2013 we made 64 quarts of kraut and on June 30 this year we made 67 quarts. I hope this year’s is as good as last year’s because it was the best I ever put in my mouth!

  • The cooler weather last week put me in a mind for what we can expect from September through December.
    Fall has to be my favorite time of the year, and I’m excited that we’re now less than 40 days away from the first week of September.
    Don’t take me wrong, but summer has lost a lot of its allure for me. I’m getting older and even though I grew up in hot, hot south Georgia and lived in even hotter west Africa, I like the heat and humidity less and less.

  • Do you remember that old song from “Hee Haw” that went “Gloom, despair, and agony on me” then ended with “If it weren’t for bad luck, I’d have no luck at all”? Well, I was singing that song a couple of weeks ago.

  • I spent last Monday morning swimming through several emotions as I thought about my two veteran grandfathers and watched the veterans of Casey County gather in support of each other and their country.
    So when I saw Bill O’Reilly’s Memorial Day edition of “Watters’ World,” consisting of interviews (the majority of interviewees being half-naked drunk women on Jones Beach in Long Island) questioning them about knowledge of U.S. military history, (or lack thereof), I was a little disgusted.