.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • From Casey County to the Music City

    zjohnson@caseynews.net

    A former Casey County teen is making big waves in one of the biggest music towns in the country.

    Luke McQueary, formerly of Casey County, is playing with the Don Kelley Band in Nashville, Tenn. In addition, McQueary has been featured in a New York Times article and even mentioned in a tweet by Dr. Oz.

    McQueary’s love affair with music came from his dad whom he watched play during his childhood.

  • Casey Health Board supports anti-smoking ordinance

    By Zach Johnson

    zjohnson@caseynews.net

    The Casey County Board of Health will draft a letter of support to restrict smoking on public property.

    During a Feb. 16 Casey County Board of Health meeting, Lake Cumberland District Health Department Health Educator Jelaine Harlow recommended that board members support local efforts to pass a public ordnance against smoking in public places in Casey County.

  • Fiscal court approves soft-fall, raises

    cvanleuven@caseynews.net

    The Casey County Fiscal Court approved the purchase of safety mulch and borders for Gateway Park, and gave employees a 2 percent raise.

    At the Feb. 19 meeting, Judge Executive Randy Dial said that more updating to Gateway Park would occur after the rainy season, but felt that the mulch and borders under the playground equipment couldn’t wait.

    “I would like to go ahead with your permission and have that mulch and borders installed around the equipment,” he said.

  • Casey County real estate market heats up

    cvanleuven@caseynews.net

    It’s a sellers’ market in Casey County, and properties are changing hand at more than twice the normal rate.

    “In the last two years we’ve had probably 200 to 250 percent of normal property transfers,” said Eric Brown, Casey County Property Valuation Administrator. “That’s a pretty good indicator (of the market).”

  • Chamber to draft budget letter, hold candidate forum

    zjohnson@caseynews.net

    The Liberty-Casey County Chamber of Commerce, in their monthly meeting held on Feb. 14, introduced a candidate’s forum and approved writing a letter to state representatives about Governor Matt Bevin’s proposed budget.

    Chamber President and Casey County High School Principal Josh Blevins requested that the organization write a letter to state representatives on points of concern of the Governors’ proposed budget as it pertains to Casey County.

  • Work programs benefit inmates, community

    cvanleuven@caseynews.net

    The Casey County Jail inmate work programs have saved nonprofit organizations hundreds of thousands of dollars since its inception in 2002. They also instill a strong work ethic in inmates, who reap its benefits after their time is served.

    Casey County Jailer Tommy Miller said that besides cleaning roadways, public buildings and property, the inmates at Casey County Jail also grow their own food, which he estimates saves the county $40,000 a year.

  • Narcan Donation
  • Engineering students heading toward successful future

    Casey County High School’s Project Lead the Way Engineering students are on their way to great things, and they showed the Casey County Board of Education demonstrations of two projects the students worked on Feb. 12 at Casey County Middle School.

  • First meeting held for Trail Town

    “This is something that has been on my agenda for three years and I’m excited to finally start the process of making Casey County, Kentucky’s next Trail Town,” said Casey County’s Economic Development Authority and Trail Town President, Josh Switzer as he welcomed those in attendance to the first Trail Town Task Force Committee meeting on Feb. 7.

  • State cites oversight weakness in Casey sheriff’s audit

    State Auditor Mike Harmon found that the Casey County Sheriff’s Office presented a fair accounting of its tax money transactions, but he also cited a material weakness in segregation of duties and oversight.

    In a Feb. 7 release of the Casey County Sheriff’s Tax Settlement for fiscal year 2016, Harmon cites that two sheriff’s employees handle both payments out and deposits into the county’s books, which leaves the door open for undetected misappropriation.